Travel Theme-Words

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My

Words

Travel Theme.

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Some words from the Somme.We soon became used to  seeing these words.

There were also words telling us where we were

and where to go!

And words to explain the site when we arrived.

These few days in France made me realise how lonely

it must be for migrants who do not speak

the language of their adopted home.

 

A few words…a big impact.

Words to match the images above?

And heartfelt words from the very young.

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Where’s My Backpack: Words

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Jo’s-Monday-Walk-Wk26_Indian-Chinese-Cemetery

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Jo’s Monday Walk

Week-26

Ayette,

Indian and Chinese Cemetery

Our first stop of our

Somme Battlefields tour was

at the Ayette,

Indian and Chinese Cemetery.

After our first shock at India and China being involved

we all came to the conclusion that India was logical

as it was part of the Commonwealth.

However, China was a mystery.

In all my lifetime I had never heard of

either country being involved in WW I.

 

And according to the first photo China was a neutral country.

However with allied armies requiring supplies…

 the British War Office approached authorities

in both countries asking for a labour force

to transport supplies to the front lines.

 

While a relatively ‘safe’ job, both countries lost men

to long range artillery, air raids and illness.

A total of 2,000 Chinese and 1,500 Indian labourers

died while serving on the Western Front.

 

This was the first cemetery we visited and it was

here that we noticed the serenity and

immaculately kept surrounds.

Also the fact that this cemetery was alongside a road,

which may sound silly.

However, many country cemeteries,

that I have visited in Victoria,

are in a secluded plot of land with is

only accessible via a narrow track or road.

I should also add that any headstone which appears a dirty brown colour is,

in all likelihood, due to the photo being over exposed and my attempts 

at darkening the image to reveal text…particularly on headstones.  

Also there are some photos where the colour does not quite match,

on this post photo 2.  

Also the result of extremes of sun and shadow which I have endeavoured

to correct in photo shop.  

My skills with Photoshop are lacking…quite a bit.

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Jo’s Monday Walk

Pic-and-Word-Challenge_Wk92_Ghosts


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Week 92

Ghosts

I found this week’s theme a hard one to get my head around.

Then I remembered stories of how all

World War I Cemeteries and Monuments

were cared for during World War II…

and I wondered if the ghosts of

the Great War had a hand

in protecting these Sacred Grounds.

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Pic and Word Challenge: 92 Ghosts

Cee-BW-Challenge-Pairs

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Cee’s

Black and White Challenge:

Pairs

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My focus is on pairs this week.

A pair of plaques at Lochnagar Crater

at La Boisselle, near Albert,

on the Somme, France.


The Australian and French flags at Bullecourt.

 

 Memorial plaques near Bullecourt

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Cee’s Black & White Challenge: Pairs

Black-&-White-Banner

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World War 1 – Diary extract

Below is an extract from Captain Dobson’s diary relating to Acting Bombardier Carlin’s actions whilst under fire around or on June 3rd, 1917.

Acting Bombardier Carlin’s records state that he was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal on June, 3, 1917.

There is no recorded date on the diary extract below.

I can only surmise what “O.P.” and “S. 9” mean. My guess, based on context of the entry, is Out Post and a type of Artillery shell. A further entry relates to a ‘S. 9. landing in the courtyard’

Appreciate thoughts, comments or corrections on my interpretations.

One day of routine manning I left Carlin and another at the tap in with instructions that if the line went we’d mend it at our end as it always got out about 150 yards from the O.P. the Hun strafing that point every day for no reason whatever and doing no damage except to a few telephone lines.   Sure enough the Hun had his strafe and the line went.  Harper was with me and another man, probably Davis.  Of course they wanted to go out and mend it, but as the line was of no great importance at the moment told them to wait till the strafe stopped – we could see and hear shells bursting.  Next thing Harper got a buzz on the phone showing it was through and a little later old Carlin’s head appeared at the parade, beaded with sweat and much wind up.  I strafed him for coming out when he was told to stay in.  His reply was, “I saw the O.P. was getting it and thought someone might be hit.”  That did not prevent him stopping to mend the line amongst the S. 9.

I have always said that “Windy Bill Carlin” is the bravest man I have met and one of the windiest. The man who is not windy cannot be brave, but the man who does his job at all times and under all conditions and with the wind up all the time, is the man I admire.

Bill_2

ANZAC DAY, 2013
Lest We Forget