THURSDAY’S SPECIAL-Windows

Windows of Europe feature this week.

Blue windows in York.

Tower of London windows.

More blue windows in

Germany’s Rhineland district.

Brown in Brugge.

Attractive Windows in Arras.

  A window in St Jean Baptiste Cathedral,

also in Arras.

 

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Thursday’s Special: Windows

THURSDAY’S SPECIAL-Words4August

I have chosen three of the words

for this week’s challenge. Probably fair to say the sun had set before I took this shot,

however,

I am sure it was setting somewhere else 🙂

Time 0700 and fog is severely limiting my horizon.


0840 and the view is not much better and

the temperature is -1 Celsius.  

Very cold for this blogger.

 

The Barwon River at Barwon Heads.

The bottom marking  is the 2.1 metre tide level of 1978.

The top marker is ‘extreme tide’.

I do not know if that level has ever been attained.

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Thursday’s Special: Words

Jo’s-Monday-Walk-Wk31_Lochnagar-Crater-Pt-2

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Jo’s Monday Walk

Week-31

Lochnagar Crater

 Part 2.

Part 1

Based on the number of photos Lochnagar Crater

will be a 4 part post.

 

Last week I mentioned memorials within

the Lochnagar Crater memorial

By now these poppy wreaths were

becoming all too common, however…

the sentiments behind each and every wreath was the same,

a heartfelt thank you and we will remember!

 

It would seem that ‘The Moles’ would refer to those

inside the 1,000 foot long tunnel.

In fact on-line research claims 18 Manchester sewer workers,

many over 40 years of age and with an average height

of about 5’4″ (average army requirement 5’8″) changed the War.

They were the founding members of the

170 (Tunnelling) Company, Royal Engineers.

Their work was the beginning of more than

3,000 miles of tunnels in

France, Belgium and Gallipoli.

While all hell raged above ground they tunnelled

silently below ground waging a secret warfare of their own.

Working in fetid air, cramped and wet conditions and with only

a candle to indicate if there was enough oxygen to breathe

they listened intently for signs, or sounds,

of the German army tunnelling towards them.

We were told that the German tunnellers were

only 5 feet away although I cannot verify that.

After the 27,000 tons of explosives were detonated

a 300 feet wide hole in the ground now known

 as Lochnagar Crater was all that was left behind.

Harry Fellows was a survivor of Lochnagar….

 

More can be read about Harry by clicking this link.

The final memorial is to Private George Nugent.  

When I took this image I either did not read, highly likely,

I took a close up of the plaque, or had forgotten his story.

 

On the far side of the Crater a tourist,

(Mr Drage of Colchester), while visiting Lochnagar,

actually discovered what appeared to be

a body emerging from the chalk about 10 metres

from the edge of the crater, in 1998.

Private Nugent’s remains were exhumed and

subsequently interred Ovillers Military Cemetery

on July 1st, 2000, exactly 84 years to the day

after he was reported as missing in action.

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Jo’s Monday Walk

THURSDAY’S SPECIAL-Slow-2

For sometime MGW has been telling me of a lookout

on the outskirts of Geelong which would be

good for photography.

 The lookout over looks Queen’s Park Golf Course

and the Barwon River.

On Wednesday morning I set off thinking I might get

some half decent shots of trees breaking through the fog.

I was on site by 0700 for a 0730 sunrise.

This shot was taken around 0840 with finger tips

totally numb and  having little or no control or strength

in my right hand due to the cold.

My car said it was -1 degree Celsius.

I have never been so happy to return to my car and warm up.

 The fog just kept rolling up the valley into my face

and did not lift until near midday.

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Thursday’s Special: Slow-2

Jo’s-Monday-Walk-Wk30_Lochnagar-Crater-Pt-1

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Jo’s Monday Walk

Week-30

Lochnagar Crater

 Part 1

Based on the number of photos Lochnagar Crater

may be a 3 or 4 part post.

The first sign that we were visiting something different…

to cemeteries, was this road side sign.

 

In the early 1970s Richard Dunning read about Lochnagar

and made it his mission to purchase the land in memory

of all who had been killed in and around the area.

 

 Lochnagar Crater, therefore, is a privately owned site dedicated

to members of the British Army who tunneled under enemy lines,

placing and detonating  27,000 tons of explosives

which created a rather large hole in the ground…

now known as Lochnagar Crater.

 

Lochnagar is lucky to be the hole in the ground that it is today.

When Richard Dunning purchased his hole in the ground,

the farmer who owned the land…

 

was seeking permission to fill it in as had been done

with its sister mine Y Sap two years earlier.

The best part about Lochnagar Crater is that the surrounding

area/battlefields are as they were over 100 years ago, and…

not only does Lochagar memorialize those who perished,

there are also several other memorials within the grounds.

And finally, there is a way in which I now have a link

to the Lochnagar Crater Memorial.

 I would love to return to view, in person,

my memorial to my Grandfather.

However, I may be well into my seventies

before this dream comes true.

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Jo’s Monday Walk

Jo’s-Monday-Walk-Wk30_Beaumont-Hamel-Pt-2

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Jo’s Monday Walk

Week-30

Royal Newfoundland Regiment

Beaumont-Hamel

Memorial site

 Part 2

If you wish to read the first Beaumont-Hamel post click here.

The Beaumont-Hamel battlefield site

is also the site of the…

 Newfoundland Regiment’s

World War I Memorial.

As we walked through original trenches I still felt exposed.

It may have had something to do with the board walk,

now inserted for our comfort,

raising us up an extra few inches.

 However, this trench seems even shallower

and there is no boardwalk.

 Today the Beaumont-Hamel battlefield is marked

by one of five Caribou (the Regiment’s emblem)

memorializing World War I

in France and Belgium.

Four are located at: Beaumont-Hamel, Gueudecourt

Monchy-le-Preux,  Masnieres, in France 

with the fifth caribou located at 

Courtrai (Kortrik) in Belgium.  

 

 Newfoundland is the home of

the sixth and seventh

Caribou Memorials.

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Jo’s Monday Walk

Jo’s-Monday-Walk-Wk29_Beaumont-Hamel-Pt-1

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Jo’s Monday Walk

Week-29

Beaumont-Hamel

 Part 1

Beaumont-Hamel is a 74 acre site where the…
Royal Newfoundland Regiment fought 

a devastating but defining battle

during World War I on the first day of

the Battle of the Somme.

 Today this now peaceful site is staffed by

young Canadians, who act as guides.

I did not ask if this young guide she would mind

if I published her photo on my blog….hence the cropping.

This was the first Memorial we visited which had been left

in the same condition as it was all those years ago.

The trees added a real sense of tranquility to the area

exacerbating the feeling of sadness for

all those who lost their lives.

As with many of the battles of World War I

the British Commanders decided to give

the German army a ten minute warning of an attack

by exploding 18,000 tons of explosives under Hawthorn Ridge.

The British even ignored intelligence reports

telling them that the barbed wire had been cut

during a week long bombardment.

Their reasoning…the men who were sent out

on reconnaissance missions were inexperienced.

I really know who was inexperienced and

being an Australian it wasn’t the Canadians

or any other of the Allied soldiers.

 

Most of the Newfoundland Regiment was all

but wiped out during an assault that

lasted approximately 30 minutes.

In 1921 this site was purchased by the

people of Newfoundland.

It is the largest battalion memorial on

the Western Front and the largest area of the

Somme battlefield that has been preserved.

 Today the Beaumont-Hamel battlefield is guarded

by the Regiment’s emblem, the Caribou.

More about the Caribou in Part-2.

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Jo’s Monday Walk