Word-of-Day-Challenge-Queue

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queue is a line of things, usually people.

Queue comes from the Latin cauda, for tail.

Outside the United States it means

a line of people or vehicles waiting their turn,

so if your English friend talks about

queuing up for the movies,

that means getting in line for a ticket.

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My first experience…

It’s moments like this that I was extremely thankful

that Travel Marvel had arranged priority access

to some attractions.

This was the queue as we were

leaving Versailles Palace.

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SUNDAY-STILLS-PC-Night-Lights

 

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Seasonal lights

Chandelier in the foyeur of the

Hotel Grand,

Naples, Italy.

A restaurant near the London Eye

Paris Street lights

Geelong’s pre-dawn lights on Corio Bay.

 

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SUNDAY STILLS PHOTOS:...Night-Lights

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Pic-and-Word-Challenge_Wk251-Mathematics

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The National Gallery of Australian Art.

A building which Melburnians have

a love-hate relationship with.

However, regardless of whether one loves or hates it…

 

…we all have to admit their is a lot of mathematics

in the building’s design.

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Pic-and-Word-Challenge_Wk251-Mathematics

Pic-and-Word-Challenge_Wk250-Fear

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fear

an unpleasant emotion caused by the
threat of danger, pain, or harm.
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Even though we have only found one snake

on our property since we moved

fifteen years ago.

Even one this size strikes fear into my heart.

THe paver is 40 cm x40 cm which makes

the snake around 20cm and potentially

full of poisonous venom.

According to Google images it could be

a potentially deadly Eastern Brown Snake.

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Pic-and-Word-Challenge_Wk250-Fear

Word-of-Day-Challenge-Gargoyle

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gargoyle

a grotesque carved human or animal face or figure projecting

from the gutter of a building, typically acting as a spout

to carry water clear of a wall.

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My gargoyles are from both sides

of the English channel.

I  wish I knew why my Notre Dame de Paris gargoyles…

…are out of focus.

 

These last three are all heavily cropped images…

 

DC Photography 16

…and were captured on York Minster…

in the united Kingdom.

 

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Lens-Artist-PC-116-Symmetry

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Symmetry at, in, or near

Notre Dame de Paris.

In a small park near

Notre Dame which is in the

middle right background.

Above front entrance to

Notre Dame de Paris.

 

Rose window above front entrance.

Inside out view of one of the rose windows.

 

 

Inside Notre Dame Cathedral

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Lens-Artist Photo Challenge Patti:   Symmetry

Lens-Artist Photo Challenge Leya:   Symmetry

Lens-Artist Photo Challenge Amy:   Symmetry

Lens-Artist Photo Challenge Tina:   Symmetery

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SUNDAY-STILLS-PC-Towering

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A variety of Towers towering over

their respective landscape.

 

I’m not sure why the Tower of London was so named.

Google to the rescue:

It was founded towards the end of 1066

as part of the Norman Conquest of England.

The White Tower, which gives the entire castle its name,

was built by William the Conqueror in 1078 and was

a resented symbol of oppression, inflicted

upon London by the new ruling elite.

 

 

And now I know 🙂

 

 

 

 

 

Closer to home is…..

…Auckland’s Sky Tower in New Zealand.

Using your imagination it could be

described as similar to Sydney’s Tower. 

The major point of difference is that we

celebrated Number 2 Daughter-in-Law’s birthday

with dinner in the Auckland Sky Tower in 2018.

 

Many of my photos I remember taking,

not so this one over Paris…

 

…not from the top observation point. 

Alas we only made it to the

second observation deck.

 

I guess we should be happy to have made

it up the Eiffel Tower at all,

because we did not set foot inside the

Giotto Bell Tower in Florence, in Italy.

 

I think we may have paid more than we should have,

to visit the observation deck of the Burj Khalifa

(Burj meaning Tower, so I was told). 

However, it was a wonderful, last day, experience

and we thought some pricey

souvenir photos worthwhile. 

 

High Tea at the Burj Al Arab was our

main reason for a stopover in Dubai. 

Again, not something to do on a weekly basis

but a wonderful experience. 

We nudged the local retail economy along 

with a new set of clothes each, for the occasion,

and felt human after living in the same

traveller kit for four weeks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

These Towers are springing up

all over the Western District.

  Almost at our back door, on the farm,

is a wind farm of over 100 towers

claimed to be the largest in

the Southern Hemisphere. 

May have been when built,

but no longer so, I suspect.

 

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SUNDAY STILLS PHOTO:….Towering

 

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Pic-and-Word-Challenge_Wk248-Rosette

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rosette

** a rose-shaped decoration, typically made of ribbon, worn by supporters of a sports team or political party
or awarded as a prize.
**an object or arrangement resembling a rose.
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I don’t have one picture which comes

under the ‘rosette’ category as in

the first interpretation of the word.

However, if one uses imagination…

 

 

…these stained glass windows…

 

may fit the second interpretation of ‘object’.

 

 

The

Rose Window

in York Minster.

 

 

I only have exterior images of

York Minster’s

Rose Window.

 

 

However, these last two from

Notre Dame de Paris…

…both fit the Rose Window category

and hopefully look a bit rosette-ish,

as well.

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Pic-and-Word-Challenge_Wk248-Rosette

One-Word-Sunday-Arch

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Archways in the centre of

Hamilton Botanical Gardens,

New Zealand.

Arch of Victory

spanning

Ballarat’s Avenue of Honour

The Ballarat Avenue of Honour is famous for being the first avenue of its kind in Australia (perhaps in the world) and the longest of its kind in the southern hemisphere.

It incorporates the Ballarat Arch of Victory and extends for approximately 22 kilometres.

(Source:bih.federation.edu.au)

Arc de Triomphe, in Paris

Finally, the…

…Arch in Ypres’

Menin Gate

in Belgium.

I had heard my Father talk of

Menin Gate all my life.

So my 2017 visit was a

truly moving experience,

to visit the battlefields

and pass along the same roads

as my Grandfather did,

during World War I,

all those years ago.

Certainly Australia’s best known arch.

Not sure how it rates on a world stage

although we are constantly told

it is recognised the world over.

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One Word Sunday Challenge:  Arch