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Jo’s Monday Walk

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ANZAC DAY 2017

Ballarat

 
Ballarat, although never being much more, or less,

than an hours drive from where I have lived

is not a city I have visited very often.

This is despite the fact that it is steeped in history

as a centre of the gold rush days of the 1800s

through to its contribution and commemoration to

world conflicts in which Australia has participated.

When I think of Ballarat I think of

Sturt Streets Avenue of Honour

which I have only discovered today

commences where I thought it ended…

at the Arch of Victory.

My first image is of a statue of

Major General Harold Edward “Pompey” Elliott,

who was a senior officer in the Australian Army

during the First World War.

After the war he served as a Senator for Victoria

in the Australian parliament. (Source: Wikipedia)

Sir Albert Coates, born in Ballarat, was

an Australian surgeon and soldier.

He served as a medical orderly

in World War I serving on Gallipoli,

and as a senior surgeon for

the Australian Army Medical Corps

in World War II in Malaya. (Source: Wikipedia)

Further along is a memorial to all those conscripted…

and ordered to serve in Wars closer to home.

Although I was declared unfit to join the army,

being conscripted was one of the few ‘raffles’

I have won in my lifetime.

With the lack of respect of many of today’s younger generation

I think twelve month compulsory conscription

would not be a bad thing.

However, this does not mean every conscript

would be automatically ordered to war.

My God son has recently enlisted and apart from

a few ups and downs is enjoying his basic training,

according to his family.

Various Wars close to Australasia.

World War II is also remembered with its…

own memorial.

Double click this image to enlarge and read inscription.


However, I am not sure what his WW II monument

is supposed to symbolise.

 Around this time of year Ballarat is known

for its Begonia Festival.

These red begonias are planted especially for ANZAC Day…

and are usually in full bloom this week

according to the gardener fertilising them.

A few kilometres drive further along Sturt Street

and you will come across

Ballarat’s Arch of Victory.

When conducting some research for this post I discovered that

this is the beginning of The Avenue of Honour.

The Ballarat Avenue of Honour is famous for being the

 first avenue of its kind in Australia (perhaps in the world)

and the longest of its kind in the southern hemisphere.

It is acknowledged, however, that there were other

Avenues of Honour which preceded Ballarat’s,

but none are as long.

It incorporates the Ballarat Arch of Victory and extends for

approximately 22 kilometres along the Western Highweay.

In total, the trees represent 3912 Ballarat and district men and

women who served in World War One – 528 of whom

were killed in battle or died of wounds or disease.

The trees were planted in order of the soldiers enlistment

along the Western Highway, consisting of 3,771 trees.

(Source: Ballarat Avenue of Honour)

With an Avenue of Honour that long

it is unlikely that we will forget.

At the time of my visit, mid February,

just left of the Arch of Victory is another

memorial to those who suffered

as a consequence of War.

Read on….

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Jo’s Monday Walk

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Jo’s Monday Walk

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Hot Air Ballooning,

Melbourne-2

 
Last week I left off just as…

our hot air balloons were being filled with cold air.

However, it wasn’t long before hot air was being pushed in…

and the balloons were beginning to stand upright.

I think this looked spectacular in the half dark…

 and would like to see what our balloon looked liked

when it was given a warm blast of air.

Without much further ado we lifted off gracefully…

into a chilly Melbourne sky.
No engine roar, or thrust back into one’s seat…

just the knowledge that if I jumped out

it was going to take longer and longer

before I landed on terra firma!

Two other ballooning companies were aloft that morning.

And these are never before seen views of Melbourne…

before sunrise.

Little did we know that the GoPro camera

was set to take a photo every 5 seconds.

We were not expecting to be emailed

around 135 photos as part of the deal,

but extremely grateful to receive them.

Every now and again we would see this sight.

If you look carefully you will see a GoPro hanging

on the left side of this balloon.

 Although the moon had not set the first of the sun’s rays

were beginning to light up some of

the taller building in Melbourne’s CBD.

 More next week.

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Jo’s Monday Walk

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Hot Air Ballooning,

Melbourne-1

 
On Tuesday evening we checked into a

Melbourne Hotel for the second time in 5 days

and prayed for good weather the next morning.

This week we chose the

Grand Chancellor in Lonsdale Street.

 I think the Grand Chancellor is a bit older than the apartments

we booked last week, however it more than compared to

many of the European Hotels we stayed at last September.

Lonsdale Street at 0430 Wednesday morning, waiting for…

The Picture This Ballooning mini van to collect us.

After a quick coffee and paperwork…there is always

paperwork these days…we drove to the launch site

and began to help prepare the balloon.

Helping was voluntary and unloading the basket

only meant a bit of a tug as the trailer moved forward.

Once it had tipped up like this the pilot gave us

some more safety commentary after which the trailer

was pull clear of the basket.

I always thought that hot air balloons were filled with hot air!

Wrong again…but don’t tell MGW.

The only air in the balloon at this stage is  cold air

being blown in by that large red fan beside the basket.

More next week.

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Jo’s Monday Walk

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Salzburg-1

 
Leaving Lucerne we journeyed on to Salzburg.

The Salzburg Bridge which is…

covered with locks was one of the first attraction

we were guided to during our walk.

There is a similar (roughly) pedestrian bridge in Melbourne,

where the locks are being removed for safety (weight) reasons.

Across the bridge is a hotel the likes of which

I have not seen in Australia.

Then on to some o the narrow lane ways and streets

where all merchants have nice signs or symbols

of their trade hanging outside their premises.

  Although language was proving a bit of a barrier

one of these signs appears to be the same

all over the world.

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Jo’s Monday Walk

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Lucerne-3

 
Last week I left this journey as we reached

the end of our train trip at almost the top of

Mt Rigi, in Switzerland.

This week I have jumped to the very top of Mt Rigi…

mainly because the walk up was leaving me

a little breathless, although it was nice

to see some of the younger generations

fall behind me…

 Mt Rigi is almost surrounded by three lakes; namely,

Lake Lucerne, Lake Zug and Lake Lauerz.

After a few minutes at the top it was time to retrace our steps…

which I though would be a slower journey

as my knees do no like walking down stairs/hills etc.

It was slower, but it also gave me time to take a few shots.

About half way and still well above the kiosk, on the right,

with the train terminal further down in the middle background.

Mt Rigi kiosk.

This group is just beginning their trek up to the pinnacle…

while we had jostled for our seats on the train

before departing Mt Rigi for a comfortable cruise,

on Lake Lucerne, back to Lucerne.

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Jo’s Monday Walk

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Lucerne-2

 
In Lucerne again this week and more

of a ride than a walk.

After we visited the Lucerne Lion…

(More about the Lucerne Lion, here)

we were back on our coach for a short drive

to a rail line to take us to the top of Mt Rigi.

Mt Rigi is 1798 metres above sea level,

a bit shorter than Australia’s highest mountain,

Mt Kosciuszko which stands 2,228 metres.

However, I have never been to the top

of Mt Kosciuszko.

We drove past architecture not seen Down Under…

until we were finally on our train ride up Mt Rigi.

I thought I had my camera level but

this shot says otherwise, I think.

 

The ride seemed so step and the dairy cows also

seemed to have two short legs enabling them

to stand level on this steep terrain.

Finally we arrived at the end of  our journey.

The final 200 or so metres was by

the not so reliable (these days)

Shanks’ Pony.

However I did make it to the top.

Images to follow next week.

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Jo’s Monday Walk

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Lucerne

 
Recently I completed a book titled

Song of the Bellbirds

written by an Australian author

Anne McCullagh Rennie.

Song of the Bellbirds follows the fortunes of a

young Australian Singer who wins a scholarship

to study Opera in Vienna.

One day her European born husband takes her to Lucerne…

and they wander across the Chapel Bridge.

As they walk arm in arm they admire the craftsmanship

taken to build the bridge…

and the Austrian husband translates all these writings

under the bridge’s roof for our Aussie Diva.

Just wish he was there when we were.

As you may have noticed the outside of the bridge

was covered with flowers in September…

and there was even room for a busker to

entertain tourists and locals alike.

So, not a long walk this week but one

I will remember for a very long time.

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Jo’s Monday Walk