Lens-Artist-PC-109-Under-the-Sun

 

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Mostly under African sun today.

Soon to be a setting sun over Namibia…

…and Botswana’s Chobe River.

Waiting on Chobe River for

sundown over Namibia.

Nearing sundown in

Greater Kruger National Park

 

Under Geelong Winter Sun.

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Lens-Artist Photo Challenge Patti:   Under-the-Sun

Lens-Artist Photo Challenge Leya:  Under-the-Sun

Lens-Artist Photo Challenge Amy:  Under-the-Sun

Lens-Artist Photo Challenge Tina:  Under-the-Sun

 

One-Word-Sunday-Nosy

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We named this cub ‘Nosy’

and his sister became became known as ‘Rosy’

 

Mum ‘Limpy’ okayed Nosy to go

and watch the tourists.

 

And what better place to watch tourists from

but a pile of Elephant dung.

 

 

A few minutes latter Nosy was joined by Rosy.

 

Together they played for us

until just before sundown.

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One Word Sunday Challenge:  Nosy

Cee’s-Hunt4Joy-Dance-It-Out

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Some farewell entertainment at

Sausage Tree Safari Camp…

…near the end of our first

African Safari, 2013.

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Dubai fire dancer.

 

 

Whakarewarewa Maori Village dancers,

Rotorua,

New Zealand.

 

Belly Dancer,

Dubai.

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Cee’s-Hunt-for-Joy-Challenge: Dance-It-Out

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Lens-Artist-PC-103-Surprise

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Towards the end of our first day

in Kruger National Park…

…our driver received a message which lead us to

what I call my National Geographic shot.

So called because it is where I thought it

most likely to see such a shot…

 

…and also because I imagined that such an image

would require much patience

and luck to capture.

 

 

On our final morning at

Sausage Tree Safari Camp

we were woken by the sound of

breaking tree branches.

Upon looking outside into the darkness

I noticed this passerby, probably heading

for the water hole.

More surprising was the fact that it was only

this image which made me realise the there was only

a three foot six inch high fence

separating us from wildlife.

 

The following year another surprise

at Botswana’s Elephant Sands.

While at breakfast we noticed this elephant

wandering past last night’s accommodation.

We wondered how many other had

wandered past during the night.

Elephant Sands is a water hole which elephants come

to drink at any time of day or night.

As with all animals there were more

at night than during the day.

Some of the accommodation can bee seen

in the background for the record my camera

lens was set at 55 mm for this shot.

 

 

Back to 2013 and our last evening at

Sausage Tree Safari Camp.

We were offered one last surprise game drive.

About half an hour into the drive the message

came through of a sighting…at

the other end of the reserve.

 

 

 

Long story short.

Mother Limpy watched on while

Nosy and Rosy (our nicknames for the cubs)

came to within twenty-five feet of our

vehicle to watch the tourists

and play on the elephant dung.

Twenty breath taking minutes and 300 shots later,

as the sun neared the horizon,

our driver alerted other vehicles

in the reserve of our sighting.

 

 

We had seen the work of a local artist,

made contact via Facebook and had one of our photos

converted into to into a charcoal sketch which

now adorns our living room wall.

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Lens-Artist Photo Challenge Patti:   Surprise

Lens-Artist Photo Challenge Leya:    Surprise

Lens-Artist Photo Challenge Amy:   Surprise

Lens-Artist Photo Challenge Tina:    Surprise

One-Word-Sunday-Flare

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The friendly giraffe was again waiting

near the gate as we set off

on our morning Game Drive.

Kwa Nokeng Lodge

Our first morning in Botswana.

 

 

Mostly these are…

 

…Geelong sunrises…

…or just after sunrise.

The image tags say it is a sunset

over Moorabool Valley.

 

 

 

A frosty morning in the garden.

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One Word Sunday Challenge:  Flare

Tuesday-PC-Wk205-Connect


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Whenever I see a mob of sheep

I think of farming days…briefly,

…until the realization that it only takes a cold,

wet break in the weather to wipe out

many of the lambs.

 

 These cubs bring about warm, fuzzy feelings

of how lucky we were to see them

and their mother..

A similar feeling comes when viewing most of

my African animal photos.

Although vets had to put Limpy down less than

twelve months after this photo was taken,

I will never forget the feeling as she turned

her head and looked straight into my cameras lens.

We were travelling in an open side vehicle.

She was only about twenty feet from me

and I can still feel the goose bumps

covering my body as this image was taken.

Limpy was the mother of the two cubs.

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