Cee’s Black and White Challenge-In-the-Distance

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Some images captured during our

eight-hour wildlife safari into

Mt Denali National Park, June 2018.

We were told this was an Osprey.

My zoom was set at 210 mm

(315mm for a 35 mm equivalent).

 

 

  Dall Sheep…the tiny white dots on the mountain.

210mm/315mm

According to McKinley lodge staff

grizzly bears were wandering to roads by the dozen,

however this was as close as we came to one.

250/375

 

 

Finally, I think this is Mount Denali.

If not my apologies.

It was a difficult eight hours and I felt

much information did not reach the back of the bus.

130mm/195mm

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Cee’s Black and White Challenge-Unusual-Perspectives

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Random shots again this week.

A couple of years ago after swinging wide in our drive

I had cause to photograph my car from this angle.

Plastic vs concrete?

  No prizes for guessing which comes off second best.

Breakfast time in the garden.

 

 

My photos invariably end up back in Africa.

I had never seen a tusk so close

prior to our visit to Elephant Whispers.

Nor had I sighted the teeth either.

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Cee-BW-Challenge-Field

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A fun field post…..

A Canola field.

Columbia Icefield, Athabasca Glacier, BC, Canada

 

 

And finally….a cricket field.

During summer months this oval becomes know as a cricket field.

After Captains toss a coin to see which side is in and which is out,

the side that goes in, goes out and only two of their players come in to bat.

The side that’s out goes into the field to try to get the side that’s in, out.

The side that’s out in the field is known as the bowling or fielding side.

After a batsman hits a ball one of the fielders fields the ball

and returns it to the wicket keeper (extreme left in this pic).

Each side has eleven members plus a twelfth man who can only

field if someone is injured.  He can also run for and injured batsman.

The side that’s in has to have two batsmen out in the field.

When ten of the in side’s batsmen are out the in side is said to be all out.

The side that’s in therefore always has one batsman who

is not out even when his side is all out

Unlike baseball with 5 fixed positions that I know of

(pitcher, catcher, and three bases)

there are only two positions on a cricket field where

the out side has to have a player.

Those are bowler and wicket keeper.

The captain of the out side can place his other

nine players at any of the other positions on the field.

Some of these fielding position are;

first, second, third and sometimes fourth slip,

first and second gully, forward short gully, mid off, long off,

cover, deep cover and short cover, extra cover (also known as sweeper)

long on, mid wicket, forward short mid wicket, silly mid off, silly mid on,

leg slip/s, square leg, forward square leg, backward square leg,

point, deep backward point, forward short point,

short and deep fine leg, long stop or very fine leg,

and third man, which can be short or deep.

Should you have no prior knowledge of cricket then I hope you are now wiser 🙂

I have written this explanation as if only played by males

to simplify the writing process.

Australia’s Southern Stars, our National Women’s Team

has just returned from the Caribbean where

they won the 2018 World T20 Championship by defeating

their English counterparts in the final.

Well done Southern Stars!

Below is how the Marylebone Cricket Club explains cricket.

Cricket Explained to a Foreigner

  • You have two sides, one out in the field and one in.

  • Each man that’s in the side that’s in the field goes out and when he’s out comes in and the next man goes in until he’s out.

  • When a man goes out to go in, the men who are out try to get him out, and when he is out he goes in and the next man in goes out and goes in.

  • When they are all out, the side that’s out comes in and the side that’s been in goes out and tries to get those coming in out.

  • Sometimes there are men still in and not out.

  • There are men called umpires who stay out all the time, and they decide when the men who are in are out.

  • Depending on the weather and the light, the umpires can also send everybody in, no matter whether they’re in or out.

  • When both sides have been in and all the men are out (including those who are not out), then the game is finished.

– Attributed (tenuously) to the Marylebone Cricket Club.

Source:

https://www.futilitycloset.com/2009/12/27/cricket-explained-to-a-foreigner/

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Cee’s Black & White Challenge: Field

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Cee-BW-Challenge-Close-Ups

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A couple of close ups form the farm this week.

It’s a…

Toadstool.

Back in the day I spent quite a few hairy times

standing on these boards.

 Quite often there was a fair breeze

and capturing the wheel,

spinning just above one’s head was the first feat.

Above seven or eight years ago

I found the mill had blown over.

The worst part was getting anyone to fix it.

No-one would/has.

However, many people have helped themselves

to what ever they have been able to steal.

Even this mill has been dragged 20-30 feet away

from where it should be and

all those parts underground removed.

Last year I discovered a 3,000 gallon

water tank had been stolen.

And all because we no longer live there

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Cee’s Black & White Challenge: Close-Ups

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Cee-BW-Challenge-Any-Two

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Two of anything this week.

An African eagle and an

African Starling (I suspect) sharing a tree.

 

Two giraffes also sharing a tree.

 

Cape Buffalo

Zebras having a meeting.

A week or so ago, preening seagulls

at Geelong’s Corio Bay.

On Friday I drove up Mount Buninyong,

about a sixty minute drive inland,

and discovered there a two roads.

An up road and a down road.

From Mount Buninyong, two trees were an easy find.

So!

Have just re-read the challenge and realised

that we were supposed to post two different things.

First photo is okay, I think.

So here is Taji and her new toy.

I am told it is a Cong or is that Kong?

And a Juvenile Collared Hawk which decided to

breakfast on an annoying mudlark in

our back yard, a week or so ago.

If I had known that it would be photographed

I would have had the lawn mower out to knock over

the weeds that seem to thrive when

other grasses want water.

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Cee’s Black & White Challenge: Any-Two

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Cee-BW-Challenge-Any-Kind-of-Seating

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A variety of outdoor seating.

Concrete outdoors settings

at Paronella Park in Queensland.

Apart from the romance behind its creation

 Paronella Park

was one of the destinations for

Australian and American solders

on R&R during world War 2.

Perhaps made from a recycled packing case??

 

Geelong Botanic Gardens.

 

Picnic table.

 Bench seat, Geelong Botanic Gardens.

 

Another bench seat, Geelong Botanic Gardens.

Some street art from Melbourne.

Not sure it was design as a seat but I have

seen it used as such.

The most simple and easiest seat to make.

Probably need a ten-ton crane to move it though.

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Cee’s Black & White Challenge: Any-Kind-of-Seating

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Cee-BW-Challenge-Older-than-50-years

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Some fairly basic 50-year-old objects.

Buckingham Palace was around when I was

in primary school in the fifties.

 

Guides and research tell us the Colosseum

was completed around 1900 years ago.

The only part of my woolshed that was not ancient

was the roofing on the right side of the gable

and the skillion roof, same side.

They were both removed by the closest thing

to a tornado/hurricane to hit our farm.

And yet it was only strong enough to lift

a pile of leaves which MGW had just swept up

and dump them over the track

when it reached our house

about 100 metres further on.

I know I posted this shot last week, however,

I am fairly certain that it would have

been born before me.

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Cee’s Black & White Challenge: Older-than-50-Years

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