Pic-and-Word-Challenge_Wk161-Remembrance-Day-2018

 

My own Remembrance Day post

along with some Canadian Memories for you Patrick.

Although I must confess they are

memorialising a New Foundland Regiment.

and not a BC regiment.

As we walked the trenches my thoughts were that there

was not enough cover and I would be wanting to

dig down another foot or so if someone was shooting at me.

If anyone recognises this young lady

and she would like a full copy of the photo I will oblige.

I don’t like posting photos

if have not asked the subject.

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Remembrance Day 2018

Before visiting the Western Front Battlefields in June 2017,

I had heard that Flanders poppies grew like weeds

on the Somme battlefields. 

While this photo was taken in a cemetery,

the second image was a typical farm sight.

The photo below however, was not 


And was an unexpected sight… 

On this day,

the eleventh day

of the eleventh month

at the eleventh hour

World War I ended

in 1918. 

Today is Remembrance Day

 

“We will remember them.”

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Pic-and-Word-Challenge_Wk161_Rememberance-Day-2018

November 2018 WitsEnd Inspirations: Unexpected

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Toy
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Mostly Canadian ‘threes’ this week. I always think of the Maple Leaf asking

having three distinct sections.

Apologies to all Canadian followers

who may disagree.

This shot taken just prior to…

 three buglers playing

the Last Post at Menin Gate,

Ypres, Belgium.

Three flags at

Beaumont-Hamel War Memorial

on the Somme-Battlefields.

 

This day last year I was still on my way to France.

This caribou appears to have three main antlers

I’m not familiar with caribou and

I am really wondering if it is a caribou.

Google does not have any caribou images

which closely resemble this artistic creation.

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Pic and Word Challenge: Three

Jo’s-Monday-Walk-Wk30_Beaumont-Hamel-Pt-2

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Jo’s Monday Walk

Week-30

Royal Newfoundland Regiment

Beaumont-Hamel

Memorial site

 Part 2

If you wish to read the first Beaumont-Hamel post click here.

The Beaumont-Hamel battlefield site

is also the site of the…

 Newfoundland Regiment’s

World War I Memorial.

As we walked through original trenches I still felt exposed.

It may have had something to do with the board walk,

now inserted for our comfort,

raising us up an extra few inches.

 However, this trench seems even shallower

and there is no boardwalk.

 Today the Beaumont-Hamel battlefield is marked

by one of five Caribou (the Regiment’s emblem)

memorializing World War I

in France and Belgium.

Four are located at: Beaumont-Hamel, Gueudecourt

Monchy-le-Preux,  Masnieres, in France 

with the fifth caribou located at 

Courtrai (Kortrik) in Belgium.  

 

 Newfoundland is the home of

the sixth and seventh

Caribou Memorials.

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Jo’s Monday Walk

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Jo’s Monday Walk

Week-29

Beaumont-Hamel

 Part 1

Beaumont-Hamel is a 74 acre site where the…
Royal Newfoundland Regiment fought 

a devastating but defining battle

during World War I on the first day of

the Battle of the Somme.

 Today this now peaceful site is staffed by

young Canadians, who act as guides.

I did not ask if this young guide she would mind

if I published her photo on my blog….hence the cropping.

This was the first Memorial we visited which had been left

in the same condition as it was all those years ago.

The trees added a real sense of tranquility to the area

exacerbating the feeling of sadness for

all those who lost their lives.

As with many of the battles of World War I

the British Commanders decided to give

the German army a ten minute warning of an attack

by exploding 18,000 tons of explosives under Hawthorn Ridge.

The British even ignored intelligence reports

telling them that the barbed wire had been cut

during a week long bombardment.

Their reasoning…the men who were sent out

on reconnaissance missions were inexperienced.

I really know who was inexperienced and

being an Australian it wasn’t the Canadians

or any other of the Allied soldiers.

 

Most of the Newfoundland Regiment was all

but wiped out during an assault that

lasted approximately 30 minutes.

In 1921 this site was purchased by the

people of Newfoundland.

It is the largest battalion memorial on

the Western Front and the largest area of the

Somme battlefield that has been preserved.

 Today the Beaumont-Hamel battlefield is guarded

by the Regiment’s emblem, the Caribou.

More about the Caribou in Part-2.

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Jo’s Monday Walk