Wordless Wednesday17_2504_ANZAC_Day

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Tuesday April 25 is ANZAC Day in

Australia and New Zealand.

ANZAC Day commemorates the

Australian and New Zealand Army Corps

efforts at Gallipoli in World War I.

Throughout Australia, New Zealand and other

countries where ANZACs served during two World Wars

Dawn Services are conducted

to commemorate…

those who served, lost their lives

and were injured during these conflicts.

This service had several hundred residents

braving wet weather to attend the 0600 service.

My home town had about 80 residents attend its service.

The area has a population of around 400.

Our eldest son, at the behest of his

New Zealand girlfriend drove across to

Melbourne’s Dawn Service.

Marvelous what love will do!!

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Hope you enjoyed.

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Wordless Wednesday

Wordless Wednesday (create-with-joy.com)

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Black and White Tuesday17-2504-ANZAC_Day

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Black and White Tuesday

 April 25, 2017

ANZAC Day

 

I seem to be having excuses for not posting Black and White photos recently.  

Today is another important day in Australian and New Zealand and

various other nations will be conducting dawn commemorative services

to remember the ANZACs

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When I visited Ballarat in mid-February,

it was the day before…the Grieving Mother Garden,

located near The Arch of Victory,

was to be officially opened.

Ballarat’s Grieving Mother was receiving

some final touches from its creators prior

to its public unveiling the next day.

Based on figures in my Jo’s Monday Walk post

there would have been over 500 grieving mothers,

and families, during World War I alone.

 

All of that was forgotten on this

warm and sunny day in February 2017, however.

The whole area looked a picture.

Chairs were aligned for local and visiting dignitaries,

cameras were set up and the gardens was in top condition…

 

for Ballarat’s Grieving Mother.

Ballarat’s Grieving Mother was created by

Peter Corlett and Peter Morley

On ANZAC Day 2017 the Grieving Mother

is another reason not to forget.

 

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Hope you enjoyed.

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Jo’s-Monday-Walk250417-Wk17_ANZAC_DAY

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Jo’s Monday Walk

Wk-17

ANZAC DAY 2017

Ballarat

 
Ballarat, although never being much more, or less,

than an hours drive from where I have lived

is not a city I have visited very often.

This is despite the fact that it is steeped in history

as a centre of the gold rush days of the 1800s

through to its contribution and commemoration to

world conflicts in which Australia has participated.

When I think of Ballarat I think of

Sturt Streets Avenue of Honour

which I have only discovered today

commences where I thought it ended…

at the Arch of Victory.

My first image is of a statue of

Major General Harold Edward “Pompey” Elliott,

who was a senior officer in the Australian Army

during the First World War.

After the war he served as a Senator for Victoria

in the Australian parliament. (Source: Wikipedia)

Sir Albert Coates, born in Ballarat, was

an Australian surgeon and soldier.

He served as a medical orderly

in World War I serving on Gallipoli,

and as a senior surgeon for

the Australian Army Medical Corps

in World War II in Malaya. (Source: Wikipedia)

Further along is a memorial to all those conscripted…

and ordered to serve in Wars closer to home.

Although I was declared unfit to join the army,

being conscripted was one of the few ‘raffles’

I have won in my lifetime.

With the lack of respect of many of today’s younger generation

I think twelve month compulsory conscription

would not be a bad thing.

However, this does not mean every conscript

would be automatically ordered to war.

My God son has recently enlisted and apart from

a few ups and downs is enjoying his basic training,

according to his family.

Various Wars close to Australasia.

World War II is also remembered with its…

own memorial.

Double click this image to enlarge and read inscription.


However, I am not sure what his WW II monument

is supposed to symbolise.

 Around this time of year Ballarat is known

for its Begonia Festival.

These red begonias are planted especially for ANZAC Day…

and are usually in full bloom this week

according to the gardener fertilising them.

A few kilometres drive further along Sturt Street

and you will come across

Ballarat’s Arch of Victory.

When conducting some research for this post I discovered that

this is the beginning of The Avenue of Honour.

The Ballarat Avenue of Honour is famous for being the

 first avenue of its kind in Australia (perhaps in the world)

and the longest of its kind in the southern hemisphere.

It is acknowledged, however, that there were other

Avenues of Honour which preceded Ballarat’s,

but none are as long.

It incorporates the Ballarat Arch of Victory and extends for

approximately 22 kilometres along the Western Highweay.

In total, the trees represent 3912 Ballarat and district men and

women who served in World War One – 528 of whom

were killed in battle or died of wounds or disease.

The trees were planted in order of the soldiers enlistment

along the Western Highway, consisting of 3,771 trees.

(Source: Ballarat Avenue of Honour)

With an Avenue of Honour that long

it is unlikely that we will forget.

At the time of my visit, mid February,

just left of the Arch of Victory is another

memorial to those who suffered

as a consequence of War.

Read on….

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walking-logo

Jo’s Monday Walk

DISCOVER CHALLENGE17_0112_Transcript

Transcript

 

In April 2013 around ANZAC Day (April 25) I

transcribed this diary extract about my

Grandfather during World War I.

The entire post may be found HERE

One day of routine manning I left Carlin and another at the tap in with instructions that if the line went we’d mend it at our end as it always got out about 150 yards from the O.P. the Hun strafing that point every day for no reason whatever and doing no damage except to a few telephone lines.   Sure enough the Hun had his strafe and the line went.  Harper was with me and another man, probably Davis.  Of course they wanted to go out and mend it, but as the line was of no great importance at the moment told them to wait till the strafe stopped – we could see and hear shells bursting.  Next thing Harper got a buzz on the phone showing it was through and a little later old Carlin’s head appeared at the parade, beaded with sweat and much wind up.  I strafed him for coming out when he was told to stay in.  His reply was, “I saw the O.P. was getting it and thought someone might be hit.”  That did not prevent him stopping to mend the line amongst the S. 9.

 I have always said that “Windy Bill Carlin” is the bravest man I have met and one of the windiest. The man who is not windy cannot be brave, but the man who does his job at all times and under all conditions and with the wind up all the time, is the man I admire.

It is one of the few pieces of memorabilia

I have of either of my Grandfathers,

and even though I think the conflict was abhorrent,

I am still proud of their efforts during that time.

My Grandfather was awarded a

Distinguished Conduct Medal

for this and other action while serving in

France and Belgium.

Bill_2

There are some typos or spelling errors and

are included to maintain faithfulness

 to the original copy. 

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DP_Discover Challenge: Transcript

Weekly Photo Challenge-Admiration

 

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My contribution for this week’s challenge…

Admiration

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In February

The Spirit of ANZAC

exhibition was in Melbourne.

ANZACs_WW-1_8541
As I have regularly mentioned my Grandfather was

a Gunner on The Western Front after being deployed to Europe.

Was this the type of gun he was using?

ANZACs_WW-1_8548a

Whichever side of the ‘fence’ soldiers were on…

ANZACs_WW-1_8545

they are people I admire.

ANZACs_WW-1_8546

For their courage….

ANZACs_WW-1_8547

in such appalling conditions.

ANZACs_WW-1_8548a

For their ability to help a mate…

ANZACs_WW-1_8544

and for their ability to continue marching on.

ANZACs_WW-1_8506

However, these statistics we must never forget…
ANZACs_WW-1_8506a

because these number only represent

about half the casualties of World War 1.

LEST WE FORGET

I was granted permission to photograph the exhibition

by a representative of the organiser.

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Cee’s Odd Ball Challenge-16Wk-7

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Odd Ball

Week 7, 2016

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Wouldn’t this be great…
ANZAC_8495Ba free tour of Europe and Great Britain?

ANZAC_8495AUntil you see the Big Picture!.

Last week I visited the

Spirit of ANZAC

Centenary Experience

at Melbourne’s Exhibition Centre.

Locally known as Jeff’s Shed after the Premier who

organised its construction in the early 1990s.

This was a great exhibition focusing on World War 1,

and to a lessor degree subsequent wars Australia,

or the ANZACs have been involved in.

After receiving an iPod and headphones each time

a new section was entered appropriate commentary

would commence.

The exhibition is travelling around Australia

culminating in Sydney in June next 2017.

Click this  link to see if it is coming to a city near you

Allow a couple of hours to view it (slowly).

Sponsored by

The Victorian Government and Telstra (our major Telco)

this exhibition is free,

although you  are asked to book tickets.

Visitors are allowed to take cameras into the exhibit,

although flash photography is banned.

I was also given permission to by Telstra

use my photos in Social Media.

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Cee’s Odd Ball Challenge-7

odd-ball

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Wordless Wednesday_1111

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At the eleventh hour, of the eleventh day,Remembrance-Day-2015_0001

of the eleventh month…we remembered them.

Remembrance-Day-2015_0005Throughout Australia local communities and schools

Remembrance-Day-2015_0011joined together in remembering those who served in

Remembrance-Day-2015_0022two World Wars and many other conflicts.

Remembrance-Day-2015_0026Community members laid wreaths…

Remembrance-Day-2015_0031prior to observing the traditional one minute of silence.

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Wordless Wednesday

Wordless Wednesday (create-with-joy.com)

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Craftyspices.com_Wordless Wednesday

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