Weekly Photo Challenge-Twisted

 

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My contribution for this week’s challenge…

Twisted

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When first approached about growing blue gums…  the clean up contractor told us all fencing material

would be ‘buried’.


I guess when his time arrives he will be happy

to be dumped under a tree in a twisted mess.

 

A twisted limb frames a canola paddock.

 

Twisted trees on Mt. Buninyong.

A foggy morning and

a clear reflection in still water.

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Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge-Books-Paper

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When we moved one thing I wanted

was somewhere to store my books.

The shelving was all too quickly filled with both…

 

paper and digital audio books.

Christmas is a time of year when plenty of paper is used.

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Cee-BW-Challenge-Words-ending-in-OCK

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Cee’s

Black and White Challenge.

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I think and it has been confirmed, that…

this dress could be called a deb(utante) frock.

This flock of sheep and herd of cattle…

are certainly livestock.

The clock face of the Arras Bell Tower in France.

A group of rocks just outside Geelong

known as Dog Rocks.

Many photographers photograph this

rock formation, both day and night.

One of the Australian Navy’s ships at dock at Cunningham Pier.

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Cees-Black-White-Photo-Challenge:Words-Ending-in-Ock

Black_White

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Floral Friday18-May18

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Floral Friday Challenge.

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More from

Country Dahlias

is only about a

forty minute drive from Geelong.

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Hope you enjoy.

Click on  any of the Country Dahlias links

to go to the 

Country Dahlias 

Facebook page.

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Floral Friday

Floral Friday

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Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge-Barns-Dilapidated-Buildings

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A variety of building shots 

from the Geelong region.


Definitely an abandoned early twentieth century,

building if not earlier.

This probably does not it the dilapidated building

in the true sense of the word…

however, we were just glad it was not our place.

New owners, new broom,

no more old house.

 

I’m not certain what this building was…church, hall or house.

However, the pitch of the roof makes me think

it could be very old by our standards.

Bricks were first made in Australia five months

after convicts arrived and the first commercial bricks

were made at Norwood in South Australia in 1840

 Back to roof pitch…

I have been told that many ‘snow countries‘ have

roofs similar to this to assist in snow run off.

Is this true?

 

Finally, the closest I have to what maybe a barn of sorts.

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