Jo’s-Monday-Walk-Wk46_Courcelette

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Jo’s Monday Walk

Week-46

Courcelette, Warlencourt-Eaucourt
France

Probably the driving force behind my trip to France

and the Western Front Battlefields of World War I

was to visit the village of Courcelette, however briefly.

It was near Courcelette that my Grandfather’s

superior officer had mentioned Bill’s bravery,

under fire, in his diary.

 

This diary extract,  is one the only things I have

of my Grandfathers possessions.

And then it is probably a copy of a copy.

Even though I had found Courcelette on Google…

I was still surprised at it’s size.

With a population of 142 in the 2007 census,

Courcelette was about the same size as my home town. 

However, narrow roads and shoulder to shoulder

housing made it seem much smaller. 

Courcelette appears to be suffering the same fate

as many rural towns in Australia. 

In 1968 its population was 180;

1982…150;

1999…133 and in

2007…142 in

  Clicking anywhere on this link will take you

to the source of this information.

Therefore our visit was a drive through and…

 

we were soon on the other side of town…

 

heading for the Courcelette British Cemetery.

This must have been another drive by or mini-stop.

I am not sure if this is Courcelette as we returned

or another town altogether.

It did not take long before we were in the midst

of more farm land…

heading for Warlencourt-Eaucourt.

This memorial appears to recognise children

who died in France during World War I.

And I have only just noticed a crucified Jesus…

behind and below the French flag.

However, just out of town was our first stop

at a munitions dump.

According to Guide Phil, quality control was reduced

on the manufacture of munitions during WW I.

As a result of lowering standards one in three bombs

did not explode.

 All very interesting until Phil happened to mention

that if these old bombs decided to explode there

was enough explosive to kill all us.

I took a step or two back after that comment!!

Apparently farmers are still digging up these

old munitions and dropping them at

collection points like this one,

all over France.

Once a month authorities come and clear these sites.

This was about two weeks worth of collected ammunition.

And yes, sometimes the bombs explode.

Just ask the farmer whose plough hit  one.

The explosion went side ways and fortunately

did not kill the farmer.

The plough…well, that’s another story.

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Jo’s Monday Walk

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Cee-BW-Challenge-Houses

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Compared to most houses in Australia…

most of us thought many European cities

contained small houses which went up instead

of sprawling along the ground.

On the other hand, this is the back yard of

Schonbrunn Palace.

It is also known as the

Hapsburg’s Summer Cottage.

There is only 1,441 rooms in Schonbrunn Palace

compared to 3,000 rooms in the

Hapsburg’s Winter Palace.

At the other end of the spectrum was

this refugee camp at Calais.

Back to Amsterdam and this tiny house

squeezed in between others not much larger.

Finally, one of the many houseboats

moored in Amsterdam’s canals.

My perception of ‘small’ is based on the frontage.

Only those living in my ‘small’ houses know

how roomy they are…particularly when a house

is several stories high.

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Cee’s Black & White Challenge: Houses

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THURSDAY’S SPECIAL-Sequence

Sequence


  According to the Free Online Dictionary

‘sequence’ has the following definitions;

1. A following of one thing after another; succession.

2. An order of succession; an arrangement.

3. A related or continuous series.

I think most of these photos demonstrate

one or more of those definitions.

I commenced at the Palace of Versailles…

for my photos for his week and could not get away.

 

Even lines which seemed odd… 

 

were arranged in order.

 

    Most of these photos…

depict but a small part… 


of the Palace… 

and its gardens…

 

One need more time than we had

to thoroughly explore the gardens.

And I think his maybe as close as we came

to seeing this section of the garden.

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Thursday’s Special: Sequence

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge-Letter-P

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My contribution for

this week’s challenge

Letter-P

(Needs to have at least 5 letters in the word and start with the letter P)

Random Ps from

anywhere, again, this week.

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First up is…

Three Pairs of seagulls.

 

Patterns in a wall in York.

 

An icon of Paris.

 


A sad old house with its broken Panes of glass.

 

We were told these Colosseum Pavers

were laid when the Colosseum

was opened over 1,900 years ago.

 

Pink Petals on our Liliums.

Panels of art in the Vatican City

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Cee-BW-Challenge-Fences-Gates

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 I discovered that I had… more photos…

of cemetery fences…

than any other fence.

I also thought them…

a bit more interesting….

than other types of fence.

 

Gates were going to be a problem until I expanded

my thinking from farm gates to other gates.

Above is one of the gateways into York City….I hope.

 

 The gateway to Fromelles Military Cemetery.

I am not sure if other parts of the world know

about Fromelles Military Cemetery.

It contains the remains of over

258 British and Australian WW I soldiers

who were found in mass graves on the edge

of Pheasant Wood, just outside Fromelles.

The cemetery was established on 2010.

MGW  has a relative buried there.

Menin Gate entrance to Ypres,

in Belgium.

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Cee’s Black & White Challenge: Fences-Gates

Black-&-White-Banner

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Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge-Letter-O

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My contribution for

this week’s challenge

Letter-O

(Needs to have the letter O anywhere in the word)

Random Os from

Florence, Beaune, Geelong and Sydney

this week.

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First up is…

the Bell Tower of Florence.

Does Florence count? 🙂

 

A band rotunda in Beaune, France.

A New Holland Honey Eater courtesy of our back yard.

The Coca-Cola sign in Kings Cross, Sydney.

Of course, photos of Sydney would not

be complete without one of the

Harbour Bridge.

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I have counted twenty-three Os in this post, above this line

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Travel Theme-Warm

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My

Warm

Travel Theme.

In early June I set off on my tour of

Western Front WW I battlefields. 

MGW was not interested,

hence it was a solo trip.

MGW was not all that happy to see my Facebook

posts with me in shorts and shirts sleeves

at her relative’s Fromelles grave.

The weather had turned cold Down Under.

The sun shone on the road to

Vlaanderen, in Belgium

 and continued to do so at

Hill 60…

the site of the Christmas Truce

at Prowse Point.

All in all one could not ask for

better weather while travelling.

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Where’s My Backpack: Warm

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