Cee-BW-Challenge-Feet-Human-Animal

~~~~~

Feet from all over.

Leopard’s feet,

Kruger National Park,

South Africa.

Purple Swamp Hen,

Warrnambool

(South West)

Victoria

Probably tourist feet

in

Great Britain

Harpist feet,

Brugge,

Belgium.

Elephant

Round front feet

vs…

 

…Oval Hind feet

Black Swan

Warrnambool

(South West)

Victoria

Warrnambool is a coastal town

which fills with tourists during summer. 

It also was our shopping centre

whilst  living on the farm.

~~~~~

Cee’s Black & White Challeng:  Feet-Human-Animal

~~~~~

Black_White

~~~~~

One-Word-Sunday-Arch

~~~~~

~~~~~

Archways in the centre of

Hamilton Botanical Gardens,

New Zealand.

Arch of Victory

spanning

Ballarat’s Avenue of Honour

The Ballarat Avenue of Honour is famous for being the first avenue of its kind in Australia (perhaps in the world) and the longest of its kind in the southern hemisphere.

It incorporates the Ballarat Arch of Victory and extends for approximately 22 kilometres.

(Source:bih.federation.edu.au)

Arc de Triomphe, in Paris

Finally, the…

…Arch in Ypres’

Menin Gate

in Belgium.

I had heard my Father talk of

Menin Gate all my life.

So my 2017 visit was a

truly moving experience,

to visit the battlefields

and pass along the same roads

as my Grandfather did,

during World War I,

all those years ago.

Certainly Australia’s best known arch.

Not sure how it rates on a world stage

although we are constantly told

it is recognised the world over.

~~~~~

One Word Sunday Challenge:  Arch

Monday-Windows-PC-Brugge6-1008

~~~~~

A week or so ago I posted

this image of statues outside…

…Saint Salvator’s Cathedral

in Brugge, Belgium.

To the right of the  first photo is this one…

…which is part of this end of the Cathedral.

Ludwig of Monday Windows

asked about the bricked in windows.

Construction of this version of the Cathedral began

in 1250 and was completed around 1350.

In 1696 William III introduced a window tax in England.

Building owners were taxed according to

the number of windows in their building.

Consequently some owners bricked in

their windows to avoid paying the tax.

Source-Google: Why are windows bricked in

Would it be fair to assume that this is

the reason for bricking in these

windows also?

 

This is the trigger photo for this post.

A cropped section of my previous image.

Why are windows bricked in

~~~~~

Link to wide angle of Catheldral:

Istock photo of Cathedral

 

~~~~~

Monday-Windows-PC-Aug-10

Monday-Windows-PC-Brugge5-0308

~~~~~

Except for the signs, this could be a shop window

almost anywhere in the world.

Although Melbourne would have to be excluded

until least mid-September this year.

Just about all retail is closed until then.

Still in Brugge.

 

To the best of my knowledge this is

definitely not an Australian building.

Last from Brugge and Belgium.

~~~~~

Monday-Windows-PC-Aug-03