Cee-Black-White Challenge-Music

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A busker in Brugge, or some very brief

tourist entertainment…this young lady was very competent..

at least to my ear. 🙂

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A Melbourne busker.

Another year, another street

but still busking in Melbourne.

 

Fingers too old to play my guitar I’m afraid

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Cee’s Black & White Challenge: Music

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Cee-BW-Challenge-Geometry

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When one looks there is geometry everywhere.

Pink wrapping paper contains geometrical patterns.

Triangles everywhere.

Where?

On the walls of the

National Gallery of Victoria.

The home of Australian Art…in Melbourne.

Note the nicely blended rectangles.

Even in the Geelong suburb of Waurn Ponds…

…geometry is a feature of its external walls.

This photo of Taji’s kennel contains

at least three geometrical shapes.

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Cee’s Black & White Challenge: Geometry

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Cee-BW-Challenge-Nature

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Some  of my favourites in BW.

Hardly needs a title.  🙂  

After spending an hour or so in sub, or near zero,

temperatures in August 2017,

this was one of the few shots worth talking about.

Sunset.

 

A nature collage consisting of mainly flowers and water.

Although there is one small dry stone wall included.

Because most of these images look much better in colour

they will also feature in my Wordless Wednesday post,

scheduled for same time tomorrow.

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Cee’s Black & White Challenge: Motors

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Cee-BW-Challenge-Motors

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Cee’s

Black and White Challenge:

Motors

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Due to a lack of motor/engine photos,

I opted for the definition of motor which refers to motor cars.

Beginning with a Oldsmobile. 

Haven’t a clue really, but the number plates read MYOLDZ, so….

Not a car specialist so appreciate any errors corrected please.

A Buick if I have read the badge correctly.

A Chevvie.

This one, as are all to follow, is an

Australian made Holden

from the early to mid sixties.

An early Commodore introduced in 1978.

The mid-sized 4 cylinder Commodore was not a huge success,

from memory, in Australia

My second car.

A LH 1975 Torana.

Finally, my current ride.

The SV6 version of the VF Commodore

The last of the Australian made Commodores.   

Because some of these vehicles look much better in colour

they will also feature in my Wordless Wednesday post,

scheduled for one hour after this post.

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Cee’s Black & White Challenge: Motors

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Cee-BW-Challenge-Rocks

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About ten minutes from Geelong is this rock formation

known as Dog Rocks.

 

It is a popular place for photographers…

 

to gather for star photography.

I am afraid out on cold nights doesn’t appeal.

 

 

Early mornings are more my time of day.

For anyone wondering, I have no idea

why this rocky outcrop is called Dog Rocks.

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Cee’s Black & White Challenge: Rocks

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Cee-BW-Challenge-Hot-Cold

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Apart from brief walks to and from railway stations

Dubai was a wonderful place to visit. 

The unseasonal October heat (for us) was overpowering.

So getting to the Burj Khalifa was relatively easy

as was the ride to the 148th floor observation deck which

at 555 metres above ground level was

the world’s highest observation deck in 2016.

 

I’m guessing the temperature rose by

around 20 degrees when we stepped out

to take these photos.

Early morning February sun on Corio Bay.

 

Whether in a steaming mug of milk coffee

or straight out of the fridge…

milk is a marvellous food/drink.

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Cee’s Black & White Challenge: Hot-Cold

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Cee-BW-Challenge-Field

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A fun field post…..

A Canola field.

Columbia Icefield, Athabasca Glacier, BC, Canada

 

 

And finally….a cricket field.

During summer months this oval becomes know as a cricket field.

After Captains toss a coin to see which side is in and which is out,

the side that goes in, goes out and only two of their players come in to bat.

The side that’s out goes into the field to try to get the side that’s in, out.

The side that’s out in the field is known as the bowling or fielding side.

After a batsman hits a ball one of the fielders fields the ball

and returns it to the wicket keeper (extreme left in this pic).

Each side has eleven members plus a twelfth man who can only

field if someone is injured.  He can also run for and injured batsman.

The side that’s in has to have two batsmen out in the field.

When ten of the in side’s batsmen are out the in side is said to be all out.

The side that’s in therefore always has one batsman who

is not out even when his side is all out

Unlike baseball with 5 fixed positions that I know of

(pitcher, catcher, and three bases)

there are only two positions on a cricket field where

the out side has to have a player.

Those are bowler and wicket keeper.

The captain of the out side can place his other

nine players at any of the other positions on the field.

Some of these fielding position are;

first, second, third and sometimes fourth slip,

first and second gully, forward short gully, mid off, long off,

cover, deep cover and short cover, extra cover (also known as sweeper)

long on, mid wicket, forward short mid wicket, silly mid off, silly mid on,

leg slip/s, square leg, forward square leg, backward square leg,

point, deep backward point, forward short point,

short and deep fine leg, long stop or very fine leg,

and third man, which can be short or deep.

Should you have no prior knowledge of cricket then I hope you are now wiser 🙂

I have written this explanation as if only played by males

to simplify the writing process.

Australia’s Southern Stars, our National Women’s Team

has just returned from the Caribbean where

they won the 2018 World T20 Championship by defeating

their English counterparts in the final.

Well done Southern Stars!

Below is how the Marylebone Cricket Club explains cricket.

Cricket Explained to a Foreigner

  • You have two sides, one out in the field and one in.

  • Each man that’s in the side that’s in the field goes out and when he’s out comes in and the next man goes in until he’s out.

  • When a man goes out to go in, the men who are out try to get him out, and when he is out he goes in and the next man in goes out and goes in.

  • When they are all out, the side that’s out comes in and the side that’s been in goes out and tries to get those coming in out.

  • Sometimes there are men still in and not out.

  • There are men called umpires who stay out all the time, and they decide when the men who are in are out.

  • Depending on the weather and the light, the umpires can also send everybody in, no matter whether they’re in or out.

  • When both sides have been in and all the men are out (including those who are not out), then the game is finished.

– Attributed (tenuously) to the Marylebone Cricket Club.

Source:

https://www.futilitycloset.com/2009/12/27/cricket-explained-to-a-foreigner/

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Cee’s Black & White Challenge: Field

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