Book Review-Fifty-Fifty


Fifty-Fifty

by

James Patterson

&

Candice Fox

 

I listened to the audio version of Fifty-Fifty and was not overly impressed with the narration by Federay Holmes.  Fifty percent of the story was an all-male cast and the other fifty percent contained only two female voices.  Harriet Blue was one of them.  I felt there was little modulation in her voice at times whereas my wife thought her voice was a good Australian voice which suited those characters.

Again I question how much James Patterson and Candice Fox wrote.  One half of the story sounded ‘heavy’ while the other half was ‘lighter, faster’….a different pace altogether.  Was the ‘heavy’ section trying to reflect the perceived voices of country Australians?  Who knows?

Moving on…..

Harriet Blue is a short-tempered city detective who is moved temporarily to a country posting because she punched a lawyer defending her brother, outside a courthouse.  At her country posting she befriends the local female police officer and together they solve a case while Harriet’s friends try to help her brother back in the city.  Therefore, a city and a country story to be solved.

Brother Sam has been accused of abducting and murdering several (university age) girls although he and Harriet both maintain his innocence.  More will trigger the spoiler alerts so I will desist from any further story line comments.

I enjoyed the Fifty-Fifty storyline.  However, I do think a male and female narrator would have added interest to the audio experience.

I have rated

Fifty-Fifty

 as aread.

Image result for fifty-fifty by james patterson

Fifty-Fifty

can be purchased on-line at 

Booktopia, Fishpond and Amazon

At the time of writing my review,

April 17, 2019, other Goodreads readers

had awarded

Fifty-Fifty

an average of 3.86 stars from 7,657 ratings and 657 reviews.

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Book Review-The-Ghost-Pattern

The Ghost Pattern

by

Leslie Wolfe

(Alex Hoffmann #4)

Book number four, The Ghost Pattern, is the best of the Alex Hoffman series to date.  Alex is still battling her Russian nemesis and the ‘war’ will rage on, no doubt, in book number five.

The Ghost Pattern sees an American airliner hi-jacked of with over four hundred and forty passengers and crew on board, many of whom are doctors returning from a conference in Japan.  And no prizes for guessing who the hijackers are.

Again The Ghost Pattern contained detailed descriptions of the Russian nemesis’ health and eating habits.  However, these passages did decrease as the story unfolded and made reading much easier and enjoyable.

 

There was also an incident early in the story which was mentioned only once thereafter, and that was by the villain when recalling his failures.  I was sure one of The Agency team would pick up on this and link it to their predicament.

 

The Ghost Pattern was the first Alex Hoffman book which kept me awake into the wee hours of the morning, reading ‘one more chapter’.     I think The Ghost Pattern could be made into and excellent movie for television or the big screen.  Some of the good guys were wealthy beyond belief and it was this wealth which funded everything at the drop of a hat.  Sounds a bit farfetched, however, isn’t that what makes a good story.

At the time of writing,

Goodreads readers have rated

The Ghost Pattern

an average of 

4.33 stars

from 720 ratings and 50 reviews 

 I have rated 

The Ghost Pattern

solidread.

The Ghost Pattern (Alex Hoffmann #4)

The Ghost Pattern 

can be purchased online at 

Not-Available-Booktopia, Fishpond and Amazon

 

Book-Review_The-Sandcastle-Girls

The Sandcastle Girls,

by

Chris Bohjalian

 

 

The Sandcastle Girls

by

Chris Bohjalian

 

The Sandcastle Girls, by Chris Bohjalian is a story about the Armenian genocide in World War 1.  Dare I liken it to the Holocaust of World War 2?  I have limited knowledge of the Holocaust, and I fear I am one of the many who had not heard of the Armenian genocide which was very similar.  A racial cleansing; only this time the Turkish army was the villain.

The Sandcastle Girls is written in the first person, which I generally dislike, and in two interwoven parts.  Part one is set in 1915 Turkey, with Part 2 being set in 1979.  The 1915 setting tells the story of a family’s experience and how they manage to survive the Armenian genocide in World War 1, Turkey.  The 1979 part of the story tells of a descendant who, through a chance viewing of a photo, sees someone who she thinks may be a relative in the photo.

This is a story which, at first, did not get my attention.   Still, there was something which kept me listening even though I missed the initial 1979 passages.   Each part was written and narrated in such a manner that I kept listening…and enjoying.

Narrators Alison Fraser and Cassandra Campbell were excellent.  Their voices are so different that not once did I have to think about which part I was listening to.  And as often stated good narrators and character voices can make or break an audiobook.

Even with a negative thought or two in the beginning I will rate The Sandcastle Girls a four star book.  The storyline moved along nicely, narration was excellent and ideal for a two-part story set sixty years apart also my knowledge of the Armenian Genocide is now vastly improved.

The Sandcastle Girls

a solid book.

At the time of writing (April 5, 2019)

Goodreads readers have rated

The Sandcastle Girls

an average of 3.88 stars,

from 33,222 ratings

and 4,595 reviews.

The Sandcastle Girls

may be purchased online at

Booktopia, Fishpond and Amazon

Book Review-The-Watson-Girl

The Watson Girl

(Tess Winnett  #2)

by

Leslie Wolfe

 

The Watson Girl sees Tess has returning to work early, from leave, and immediately asked to interview a death row inmate, due for execution, for killing 34 families.

Does she become seduced by the killer’s demeanour and believe his claim?  During the interview she is told a few truths which make her question some findings of cold cases.

The Watson Girl was a slow starter and seemed to just get going when the villain of the story was given time to introduce himself.   The first villain chapter seemed to almost bring the flow of the story to a halt.  Through regular interludes with the villain readers are given a real insight into his depraved mind.  As the villain chapters progressed so too did my enjoyment of The Watson Girl.

As with all good thrillers the villain was not revealed until well into the book.  While busy wondering how the villain would be caught, slip up there was another unseen twist brewing in left field.

The Watson girl sees a subdued Tess Winnett back on the job.  She tries extremely hard to keep her tongue in check, but still has her moments.

I enjoyed The Watson Girl and rate it as a solid four star read.

Of the 3,660 Goodreads readers who rated The Watson Girl over 3,000 of those ratings have been 4 or 5 stars.  There has also been 42 one star ratings.

Goodreads readers have rated

The Watson Girl

an average of 

4.22 stars

from 3,962 ratings and 283 reviews 

 I have rated 

The Watson Girl

solidread.

Image result for the watson girl

The Watson Girl 

can be purchased online at 

Booktopia, Fishpond and Amazon

 

Book-Review-People-of-Heaven

People of Heaven

by

Beverley Harper

People of Heaven sat on my iPod for at least a year before I listened to it.  But it was worth the wait.   I have rated People of Heaven as one of my all-time favourites and definitely the favourite of my four of Beverley Harper books to date.

People of Heaven had me hooked in the first couple of minutes when the author described a young rhinoceros giving birth, to the culmination of the epilogue.  In between there appeared no topic was off-limits.  Plantation life and the treatment of native Africans, Post-Traumatic Stress Syndrome, inter-racial friendships in an apartheid driven era, sex addiction, guerrilla warfare and plain straight out murder were all dealt with in a way that was meaningful and realistic.

Narrator, Jerome Pride, must be applauded for his reading of People of Heaven.   Whether it was an Indian, Scottish, Australian accent or one of several South African accents he made them sound authentic to my ear.

People of Heaven, contains some lines and characters which, made me smile and at times those who made me feel sad.  As a story, it flowed along at a nice pace and never did I feel that there was ‘padding’ involved.

 

I think

People of Heaven

undefined

is a

read.

At the time of writing

Goodreads readers have rated

People of Heaven

an average of 4.23 stars

from 173 ratings and 6 reviews

People of Heaven

can be purchased on-line at

FishpondNot available-Booktopia and Amazon

Book Review-Devil’s-Move

Devil’s Move

by

Leslie Wolfe

(Alex Hoffmann #2)

Devil’s Move is one of Leslie Wolfe’s earlier books (published 2014) and the second of the Alex Hoffman series.

Set prior to an upcoming presidential election in the USA, Devil’s Move had great potential.  Factions within Russia are trying to organise the election outcome via controlling a new e-voting system.  Russian involvement in a presidential election!  Sound familiar?

However, the first third to half of Devil’s Move was, for me, a laborious read.  Laborious because it contained a lot of conversational passages, which annoy me no end.

 

The other burr under my saddle was the detailed locations and time zones between chapters.  Considering I was reading a mini iPad, with enlarged writing, this is information was popping up very regularly.  However!  Enough negatives.

Devil’s Move move upped the ante once setting up the plot and characters had been achieved.  At his stage Devil’s Move graduated from mystery status, to a real thriller, in my opinion

With two off-shore contractors involved in creating hardware and software for the e-voting devices, it was up to Alex Hoffman, and her colleagues, to save the day.  Alex has to negotiate her way around obstacle after obstacle.  Because she is Alex, female, she is often threatened with severe violence in her offshore environment and her authority is totally ignored.

I thoroughly enjoyed this offering from Leslie Wolfe and will continue reading the Alex Hoffman series as I find that even with a steady start each book develops into a great story.

I rated Devil’s Move a solid four star read.  Imagine if the beginning had been more to my taste!

At the time of writing,

Goodreads readers have rated

Devil’s Move

an average of 

4.23 stars

from 815 ratings and 50 reviews 

 I have rated 

Devil’s Move

solidread.

Devil's Move by Leslie Wolfe

Devil’s Move 

can be purchased online at 

Not-Available-Booktopia, Not available-Fishpond and Amazon

 

Book-Review-A-Casualty-of-War

A Casualty of War

by

Charles Todd

A Casualty of War, by Charles Todd, is set in the dying days of World War I, and sees Sister Bess Armstrong serving in a forward aid station on the Western Front.  While on leave she meets an officer and they strike up a brief friendship.  Next time she sees him is as her patient.  Patched up he returns to the Front where not long thereafter he is returned again with a stomach wound.  Both times he claimed it was a distant (British) cousin who shot him.

Shipped back to England and a psychiatric Captain Travis is found restrained because hospital staff thinks he is ‘mad’.  Bess disagrees and sets out to help him find his English half of the family.  Captain Travis’ family moved to Barbados generations earlier due to a family rift.

The welcome Bess and her chaperone received upon arriving in the village where the British side of the Travis family live, is less than welcoming, and it takes some time find discovered why.  Two attempted murders, one murder and an assault, all take place prior to the mystery being unravelled.

I enjoyed A Casualty of War, that partly being due to Rosalyn Landor’s narration.   Ms Landor brought the upper class English characters to life with each of her character voices.

Goodreads places A Casualty of War in the ‘Crime/Thriller’ genre.  I would suggest it is more of a crime/mystery novel.  Either way one looks at A Casualty of War it is an enjoyable story.

I have rated

A Casualty of War

only two stars.

Goodreads readers have rated

A Casualty of War

an average of

3.90 stars

from 2,390 ratings and 329 reviews 

A Casualty of War

can be purchased online at

Booktopia, Fishpond and Amazon